In the Dark

In the Dark

Most days in the photo studio are mundane and everything moves along according to plan. When I have larger projects such as shooting page after page for a catalog, I appreciate that nothing out of the ordinary happens to mess up the progress. You are always on a schedule for these jobs and you can’t afford for anything to break your concentration. I am always fully aware of my environment. I know where all the photo equipment can be found from force of habit When I am working on a catalog display there are a lot more items strewn about the studio so you have to maintain your footing so as not to disturb a thing. In effect, your studio has taken on a different aura which can disturb your centering. It is always best to keep things in an orderly fashion so you feel organized and on point at all times.

I bring this up because there was a power outage that effected my studio one night. During the day, such an unforeseen event wouldn’t have mattered as I have large windows, but there would still have been a problem with my spotlights. I would be left to do only preliminary composition work and would have had to finish the final shots at a later time. During the evening, unless there is some street light streaming through a window or two, I would be truly in the dark during an outage, literally and figuratively. I would be tripping over equipment and might even stumble into some of my catalogue pages set ups. I can’t think of anything worse. It would be pure chaos. At the very least you have to have a tactical flashlight to avoid more mayhem. I wondered if I could do any work at all that night beyond conceptualizing a few shots. The flashlight was able to allow me to sort through what I had done to date and to plan my next moves. At least that was something. All was not lost and I could perform a few tasks relevant to the catalogue job. But of course, the outage seriously affected my progress and I would have to make up the time somehow in the wee hours of the morning. You can’t make time when you lose it, so you have to be creative and efficient. It takes everything you’ve got.

Thankfully, such outages do not occur that often seriously compromising my work. So, it has seldom been a crisis situation. With the catalogue project completion date looming in the near future, I was in a bit of a panic, the likes of which I had experienced any time before. I have never failed to come through on the due date. So now I was in the throes of pressure and anxiety. I did start to store a lot of ideas in my head so that when the lights went on, I would execute them efficiently.

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